PSP Bibliography





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Found 11 entries in the Bibliography.


Showing entries from 1 through 11


2019

Parker solar probe structural-thermal analysis challenges

The NASA Parker Solar Probe spacecraft, built by the Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Lab will fly through the outermost part of the Sun s atmosphere taking in situ measurements and imaging to improve our understanding of the corona and the solar wind. The Thermal Protection System (TPS), a 4.5-inch thick carbon-composite heat shield, limits heat transfer to the spacecraft during its flight through the Sun s atmosphere, and casts a shadow which protects the spacecraft and its instruments from the harsh thermal enviro ...

Conkey, Shelly; Congdon, Elisabeth; Schaefer, Ed; Abel, Elizabeth;

Published by: Proceedings of the International Astronautical Congress, IAC      Published on:

YEAR: 2019     DOI:

Ability testing; Carbon carbon composites; Correlation methods; Heat shielding; Heat transfer; NASA; Orbits; Probes; Software testing; Structural properties; Temperature; Test facilities; Thermoanalysis; Thermocouples; Uncertainty analysis; Parker Engineering

Case study of the parker solar probe thermal protection system: Development of a system level process for high temperature technology achievement

Successful development of high temperature systems is complex and difficult. Limitations in testing, manufacturing and materials means that design and testing of such systems is challenging. NASA s Parker Solar Probe (PSP) Spacecraft built by the Johns Hopkins Applied Physics Laboratory was launched in August 2018 and is measuring the Sun s atmosphere in situ. A critical technology development which made this mission possible is the 4.5 inch-thick Thermal Protection System (TPS) that has to withstand 2500°F and protect t ...

Congdon, Elizabeth; Mehoke, Douglas; Conkey, Shelly; Schaefer, Ed; Abel, Elisabeth;

Published by: Proceedings of the International Astronautical Congress, IAC      Published on:

YEAR: 2019     DOI:

Heat shielding; High temperature effects; High temperature engineering; Manufacture; NASA; Probes; Thermal insulating materials; Parker Engineering

2018

Stray light analysis and testing of the SoloHI (solar orbiter heliospheric imager) and WISPR (wide field imager for solar probe) heliospheric imagers

The techniques for stray light analysis, optimization and testing are described for two space telescopes that observe the solar corona: the Solar Orbiter Heliospheric Imager (SoloHI) that will fly on the ESA Solar Orbiter (SolO), and the Wide Field Imager for Solar Probe (WISPR) that will fly on the NASA Parker Solar Probe (PSP) mission. Imaging the solar corona is challenging, because the corona is six orders of magnitude dimmer than the Sun surface at the limb, and the coronal brightness continues to decrease to ten orders ...

Thernisien, Arnaud; Howard, Russell; Korendyke, Clarence; Carter, Tim; Chua, Damien; Plunkett, Simon;

Published by: Proceedings of SPIE - The International Society for Optical Engineering      Published on:

YEAR: 2018     DOI:

Diffraction; Heat shielding; Image analysis; Millimeter waves; NASA; Optical coatings; Orbits; Probes; Ray tracing; Solar cell arrays; Solar radiation; Space flight; Space telescopes; Spacecraft; Parker Engineering

2017

Full scale thermal simulator development for the solar probe plus thermal protection system

Solar Probe Plus (SPP) is a NASA mission that will go within ten Solar Radii of the sun. One of the crucial technologies in this system is the Thermal Protection System (TPS), which shields the spacecraft from the sun. The TPS is made up of carbon-foam sandwiched between two carbon-carbon panels, and is approximately eight feet in diameter and 4.5 inches thick. At its closest approach, the front surface of the TPS is expected to reach 1200°C, but the foam will dissipate the heat so the back surface will only be about 300 ...

Heisler, Elizabeth; Abel, Elisabeth; Congdon, Elizabeth; Eby, Daniel;

Published by: IEEE Aerospace Conference Proceedings      Published on:

YEAR: 2017     DOI:

Aluminum coated steel; Carbon; Foams; Heat shielding; NASA; Probes; Simulators; Space flight; Stainless steel; Thermal insulating materials; Thermoanalysis; Vacuum technology; Parker Engineering

2016

Development of the solar probe plus spacecraft thermal protection system (TPS) thermal simulator-subscale testing

The NASA’s Solar Probe Plus spacecraft must endure extreme heat loads while passing near the Sun. Due to its high incident heatload and temperature, the spacecraft Thermal Protection System (TPS) must be simulated using a custom thermal simulator during spacecraft thermal vacuum testing. As part of the development of the TPS thermal simulator, subscale testing was performed. The design, testing, results and lessons learned are described in this paper. Especially useful are the design aspects needed to achieve the high ...

Congdon, Elizabeth; Abel, Elisabeth; Heisler, Elizabeth;

Published by: 32nd AIAA Aerodynamic Measurement Technology and Ground Testing Conference      Published on:

YEAR: 2016     DOI:

Aerodynamics; Heat shielding; NASA; Probes; Simulators; Spacecraft; Thermal insulating materials; Parker Engineering

2015

Propulsion technology assessment: Science and enabling technologies to explore the interstellar medium

As part of a larger effort led by the Keck Institute for Space Studies at the California Institute of Technology, the Advanced Concepts Office at NASA’s George C. Marshall Space Flight Center conducted a study to assess what low-thrust advanced propulsion system candidates, existing and near term, could deliver a small, Voyager-like satellite to our solar system’s heliopause, approximately 100 AU from the center of the sun, within 10 years and within a 2025 to 2035 launch window. The advanced propulsion system tr ...

Hopkins, Randall; Thomas, Herbert; Wiegmann, Bruce; Heaton, Andrew; Johnson, Les; Baysinger, Michael; Beers, Benjamin;

Published by: AIAA SPACE 2015 Conference and Exposition      Published on:

YEAR: 2015     DOI:

Antennas; Earth (planet); Hall effect devices; Hall thrusters; Heat shielding; Interplanetary flight; NASA; Small satellites; Solar equipment; Solar radiation; Sun; Tetherlines; Trajectories; Parker Engineering

2013

Solar Probe Plus mission overview

Solar Probe Plus will be the first mission to pass into the solar corona to study how the corona is heated and the solar wind is accelerated. Solving these two fundamental mysteries has been a top-priority science goal for over five decades. The Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory in Laurel, Maryland, is managing the mission for NASA s Living with a Star Program, including the development, build, and operation of the spacecraft. SPP will launch in 2018, performing 24 orbits of the Sun over a 7-year duration. ...

Reynolds, Edward; Driesman, Andrew; Kinnison, James; Lockwood, Mary; Hill, Patrick;

Published by: AIAA Guidance, Navigation, and Control (GNC) Conference      Published on:

YEAR: 2013     DOI:

Carbon; Foams; Heat shielding; Interplanetary flight; NASA; Probes; Solar cell arrays; Solar energy; Spacecraft; Temperature; Thermal insulating materials; Parker Engineering

Mechanical design of the solar probe cup instrument on solar probe plus

The Solar Probe Cup (SPC) Instrument is a Sun-facing Faraday Cup instrument slated for launch aboard the Solar Probe Plus (SPP) spacecraft in 2018. SPC is one of two instruments onboard the Solar Wind Electrons Alphas Protons (SWEAP) instrument suite and is the only SPP charged particle instrument that will not be shielded behind the spacecraft s Thermal Protection System (TPS). The 7-year SPP mission will take SPC on 24 solar encounters at perihelia ranging from 35 to 9.86 solar radii (RS). The SPC components will encounter ...

Bergner, H.; Caldwell, D.; Case, A.W.; Daigneau, P.; Freeman, M.; Kasper, J.;

Published by: Proceedings of SPIE - The International Society for Optical Engineering      Published on:

YEAR: 2013     DOI:

Charged particles; Heat shielding; Parker Engineering

2011

Testing of solar cells for the solar probe plus mission

The Solar Probe Plus (SPP) is an upcoming mission in NASA s "Living with a Star Program" to be built by the Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory. The spacecraft will orbit the sun for a primary mission duration of seven years, making a closest approach to the sun at a distance of 0.0442 AU. Instrumentation on SPP will focus on two primary science investigations: the sun s coronal heating and solar wind acceleration, and the production, evolution, and transport of solar energetic particles. The mission is sched ...

Scheiman, David; Piszczor, Michael; Snyder, David; McNatt, Jeremiah; Landis, Geoffrey; Isabella, Louis; Putt, Nicolas;

Published by: Conference Record of the IEEE Photovoltaic Specialists Conference      Published on:

YEAR: 2011     DOI:

Gallium compounds; Heat shielding; NASA; Orbits; Probes; Solar cell arrays; Space flight; Parker Engineering

2010

Development of a high-temperature optical coating for thermal management on solar probe plus

NASA s Solar Probe Plus (SPP) is approaching within 9.5 solar radii from the center of the sun. The SPP thermal protection system (TPS) is a 2.7 meter heat shield. The heat shield reaches temperatures of 1400°C on its front surface, its worst thermal case, and is subjected to launch loads, its worst mechanical case. The front surface of the thermal protection system is coated with an optically white coating in order to reduce the front surface temperature of the TPS and reduce the resulting heat flow into the spacecraft. ...

Congdon, Elizabeth; Mehoke, Douglas; Buchta, Mark; Nagle, Dennis; Zhang, Dajie; Spicer, James;

Published by: 10th AIAA/ASME Joint Thermophysics and Heat Transfer Conference      Published on:

YEAR: 2010     DOI:

Heat shielding; Heat transfer; NASA; Optical coatings; Probes; Thermal insulating materials; Thermal variables control; Parker Engineering

Combined effect of high temperature and VUV radiation on carbon-based materials

For the next exploration of the sun, missions like Solar Probe+ (NASA) or Phoibos (ESA) will be launched to answer to fundamental questions on the solar corona heating and solar winds origin. Such solar probes missions that will pass very close to the sun, respectively at 9.5 and 4 solar radii (Rs), need thermal shield to protect the payload and the instrumentation. Carbon/carbon composites can withstand the severe environment encountered during the pass of the sun and have to be studied to understand their physico-chemical ...

Eck, J.; Sans, J.L.; Balat-Pichelin, M.;

Published by: ECS Transactions      Published on:

YEAR: 2010     DOI:

Carbon; Carbon carbon composites; Heat shielding; NASA; Probes; Space flight; Parker Engineering



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