Found 193 results
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Journal Article
Authors: Howard R. A., Vourlidas A., Bothmer V., Colaninno R. C., DeForest C. E., et al.
Title: Near-Sun observations of an F-corona decrease and K-corona fine structure
Abstract:

Remote observations of the solar photospheric light scattered by electrons (the K-corona) and dust (the F-corona or zodiacal light) have been made from the ground during eclipses and from space at distances as small as 0.3 astronomical units to the Sun. Previous observations of dust scattering have not confirmed the existence of the theoretically predicted dust-free zone near the Sun. The transient nature of the corona has been well characterized for large events, but questions still remain (for example, about the initiation of the corona and the production of solar energetic particles) and for small events even its structure is uncertain. Here we report imaging of the solar corona during the first two perihelion passes (0.16-0.25 astronomical units) of the Parker Solar Probe spacecraft. . .
Date: 12/2019 Publisher: Nature Pages: 232 - 236 DOI: 10.1038/s41586-019-1807-x Available at: http://www.nature.com/articles/s41586-019-1807-x
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Authors: Lawrence David J., Feldman William C., Gold Robert E., Goldsten John O., and McNutt Ralph L.
Title: The neutron, gamma-ray, X-ray spectrometer (NGXS): A compact instrument for making combined measurements of neutrons, gamma-rays, and X-rays
Abstract:

The Neutron, Gamma ray, and X-ray Spectrometer (NGXS) is a compact instrument designed to detect neutrons, gamma-rays, and hard X-rays. The original goal of NGXS was to detect and characterize neutrons, gamma-rays, and X-rays from the Sun as part of the Solar Probe Plus mission in order to provide direct insight into particle acceleration, magnetic reconnection, and cross-field transport processes that take place near the Sun. Based on high-energy neutron detections from prompt solar flares, it is estimated that the NGXS would detect neutrons from 15 to 24 impulsive flares. The NGXS sensitivity to 2.2 MeV gamma rays would enable a detection of ̃50-60 impulsive flares. The NGXS is estimated to measure ̃120 counts/s for a GOES C1-type flare at 0.1 AU, which allows for a large dynamic ra. . .
Date: 01/2014 Publisher: Acta Astronautica Pages: 524 - 529 DOI: 10.1016/j.actaastro.2012.06.017 Available at: https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S009457651200255Xhttps://api.elsevier.com/content/article/PII:S009457651200255X?httpAccept=text/xmlhttps://api.elsevier.com/content/article/PII:S009457651200255X?httpAccept=text/plain
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Authors: Stansby David, Salem Chadi, Matteini Lorenzo, and Horbury Timothy
Title: A New Inner Heliosphere Proton Parameter Dataset from the Helios Mission
Abstract:

In the near future, Parker Solar Probe and Solar Orbiter will provide the first comprehensive in-situ measurements of the solar wind in the inner heliosphere since the Helios mission in the 1970s. We describe a reprocessing of the original Helios ion distribution functions to provide reliable and reproducible data to characterise the proton core population of the solar wind in the inner heliosphere. A systematic fitting of bi-Maxwellian distribution functions was performed to the raw Helios ion distribution function data to extract the proton core number density, velocity, and temperatures parallel and perpendicular to the magnetic field. We present radial trends of these derived proton parameters, forming a benchmark to which new measurements in the inner heliosphere will be compared. . . .
Date: 11/2018 Publisher: Solar Physics DOI: 10.1007/s11207-018-1377-3 Available at: http://link.springer.com/10.1007/s11207-018-1377-3http://link.springer.com/content/pdf/10.1007/s11207-018-1377-3.pdfhttp://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s11207-018-1377-3/fulltext.htmlhttp://link.springer.com/content/pdf/10.1007/s11207-018-1377-3.pdf
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Authors:
Title: News at a glance
Abstract:

In science news around the world, the U.S. National Institutes of Health (NIH) responds to a report on "foreign influences," Australia slashes its future research funding, Mars's methane mystery deepens, and the Paris agreement on climate change survives a contentious rulemaking session in Poland. Also, astronomers discover the solar system's farthest-known planet, NIH comes under fire for clinical trial reporting results, the late Paul Allen bequests a new immunology research institute, and NASA's Parker Solar Probe makes its first dip into the sun's atmosphere. Plus, a new study suggests tourists and scientists are making Antarctica's birds sick, and an interview with a Harvard University historian helps explain India's monsoon—one of Asia's most important weather patterns.


Date: 12/2018 Publisher: Science Pages: 1334 - 1336 DOI: 10.1126/science.362.6421.1334 Available at: http://www.sciencemag.org/lookup/doi/10.1126/science.362.6421.1334https://syndication.highwire.org/content/doi/10.1126/science.362.6421.1334
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Authors: Roberts Aaron, Karimabadi Homa, Sipes Tamara, Ko Yuan-Kuen, and Lepri Susan
Title: Objectively Determining States of the Solar Wind Using Machine Learning
Abstract:

Conclusively determining the states of the solar wind will aid in tracing the origins of those states to the Sun, and in the process help to find the wind's origin and acceleration mechanism(s). Prior studies have characterized the various states of the wind, making lists that are only partially based on objective criteria; different approaches obtain substantially different results. To uncover the unbiased states of the solar wind, we use "k-means clustering"—an unsupervised machine learning method—including constructed multipoint variables. The method allows exploration of different descriptive state variables and numbers of fundamental states (clusters). We show that the clusters reveal structures similar to those found by more ad hoc means, including coronal hole wind, interplan. . .
Date: 02/2020 Publisher: The Astrophysical Journal Pages: 153 DOI: 10.3847/1538-4357/ab5a7a Available at: https://iopscience.iop.org/article/10.3847/1538-4357/ab5a7a
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Authors: Lewis John S.
Title: Observability of spectroscopically active compounds in the atmosphere of Jupiter
Abstract:

The abundances of several hundred volatile compounds have been calculated at several different levels in the atmosphere of Jupiter. Complete chemical equilibrium has been assumed, and a solar-composition, adiabatic-equilibrium model of the atmospheric composition and structure is used throughout. The results which relate to upper limits on the abundances of spectroscopically active compounds in the upper atmosphere are, however, directly applicable to subadiabatic models. The principal results are that only H2, CH4, and NH3 are predicted to be observable with present techniques. These three species are in fact the only compounds conclusively identified in Jupiter spectra to date. A number of plausible previously suggested constituents of the upper atmosp. . .
Date: 05/1969 Publisher: Icarus Pages: 393 - 409 DOI: 10.1016/0019-1035(69)90094-3 Available at: https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/0019103569900943https://api.elsevier.com/content/article/PII:0019103569900943?httpAccept=text/xmlhttps://api.elsevier.com/content/article/PII:0019103569900943?httpAccept=text/plain
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Authors: Bandyopadhyay Riddhi, Matthaeus W. H., Parashar T. N., Chhiber R., Ruffolo D., et al.
Title: Observations of Energetic-particle Population Enhancements along Intermittent Structures near the Sun from the Parker Solar Probe
Abstract:

Observations at 1 au have confirmed that enhancements in measured energetic-particle (EP) fluxes are statistically associated with "rough" magnetic fields, i.e., fields with atypically large spatial derivatives or increments, as measured by the Partial Variance of Increments (PVI) method. One way to interpret this observation is as an association of the EPs with trapping or channeling within magnetic flux tubes, possibly near their boundaries. However, it remains unclear whether this association is a transport or local effect; i.e., the particles might have been energized at a distant location, perhaps by shocks or reconnection, or they might experience local energization or re-acceleration. The Parker Solar Probe (PSP), even in its first two orbits, offers a unique opportunity to study. . .
Date: 02/2020 Publisher: The Astrophysical Journal Supplement Series Pages: 61 DOI: 10.3847/1538-4365/ab6220 Available at: https://iopscience.iop.org/article/10.3847/1538-4365/ab6220
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Authors: Qudsi R. A., Maruca B. A., Matthaeus W. H., Parashar T. N., Bandyopadhyay Riddhi, et al.
Title: Observations of Heating along Intermittent Structures in the Inner Heliosphere from PSP Data
Abstract:

The solar wind proton temperature at 1 au has been found to be correlated with small-scale intermittent magnetic structures, i.e., regions with enhanced temperature are associated with coherent structures, such as current sheets. Using Parker Solar Probe data from the first encounter, we study this association using measurements of the radial proton temperature, employing the partial variance of increments (PVI) technique to identify intermittent magnetic structures. We observe that the probability density functions of high PVI events have higher median temperatures than those with lower PVI. The regions in space where PVI peaks were also locations that had enhanced temperatures when compared with similar regions, suggesting a heating mechanism in the young solar wind that is associated. . .
Date: 02/2020 Publisher: The Astrophysical Journal Supplement Series Pages: 46 DOI: 10.3847/1538-4365/ab5c19 Available at: https://iopscience.iop.org/article/10.3847/1538-4365/ab5c19
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Authors: Leske R. A., Christian E. R., Cohen C. M. S., Cummings A. C., Davis A. J., et al.
Title: Observations of the 2019 April 4 Solar Energetic Particle Event at the Parker Solar Probe
Abstract:

A solar energetic particle event was detected by the Integrated Science Investigation of the Sun (IS☉IS) instrument suite on Parker Solar Probe (PSP) on 2019 April 4 when the spacecraft was inside of 0.17 au and less than 1 day before its second perihelion, providing an opportunity to study solar particle acceleration and transport unprecedentedly close to the source. The event was very small, with peak 1 MeV proton intensities of ̃0.3 particles (cm2 sr s MeV)−1, and was undetectable above background levels at energies above 10 MeV or in particle detectors at 1 au. It was strongly anisotropic, with intensities flowing outward from the Sun up to 30 times greater than those flowing inward persisting throughout the event. Temporal association between particle inc. . .
Date: 02/2020 Publisher: The Astrophysical Journal Supplement Series Pages: 35 DOI: 10.3847/1538-4365/ab5712 Available at: https://iopscience.iop.org/article/10.3847/1538-4365/ab5712
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Authors: Winslow Reka M., Schwadron Nathan A., Lugaz é, Guo Jingnan, Joyce Colin J., et al.
Title: Opening a Window on ICME-driven GCR Modulation in the Inner Solar System
Abstract:

Interplanetary coronal mass ejections (ICMEs) often cause Forbush decreases (Fds) in the flux of galactic cosmic rays (GCRs). We investigate how a single ICME, launched from the Sun on 2014 February 12, affected GCR fluxes at Mercury, Earth, and Mars. We use GCR observations from MESSENGER at Mercury, ACE/LRO at the Earth/Moon, and MSL at Mars. We find that Fds are steeper and deeper closer to the Sun, and that the magnitude of the magnetic field in the ICME magnetic ejecta as well as the “strength” of the ICME sheath both play a large role in modulating the depth of the Fd. Based on our results, we hypothesize that (1) the Fd size decreases exponentially with heliocentric distance, and (2) that two-step Fds are more common closer to the Sun. Both hypotheses will be directly verifia. . .
Date: 04/2018 Publisher: The Astrophysical Journal Pages: 139 DOI: 10.3847/1538-4357/aab098 Available at: http://stacks.iop.org/0004-637X/856/i=2/a=139?key=crossref.287f3cbc519cdfae455bd8b9d0a9351a
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Authors: Dubois S., Savoye N., émare A., Plus M., Charlier K., et al.
Title: Origin and composition of sediment organic matter in a coastal semi-enclosed ecosystem: An elemental and isotopic study at the ecosystem space scale
Abstract:

The origin and composition of sediment organic matter (SOM) were investigated together with its spatial distribution in the Arcachon Bay - a macrotidal lagoon that shelters the largest Zostera noltii meadow in Europe - using elemental and isotopic ratios. Subtidal and intertidal sediments and primary producers were both sampled in April 2009. Their elemental and isotopic compositions were assessed. Relative contributions of each source to SOM were estimated using a mixing model. The SOM composition tended to be homogeneous over the whole ecosystem and reflected the high diversity of primary producers in this system. On average, SOM was composed of 25% of decayed phanerogams, 19% of microphytobenthos, 20% of phytoplankton, 19% of river SPOM and 17% of macroalgae. There was no evidence of. . .
Date: 06/2012 Publisher: Journal of Marine Systems Pages: 64 - 73 DOI: 10.1016/j.jmarsys.2011.10.009 Available at: https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0924796311002399https://api.elsevier.com/content/article/PII:S0924796311002399?httpAccept=text/xmlhttps://api.elsevier.com/content/article/PII:S0924796311002399?httpAccept=text/plain
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Authors: éville Victor, Tenerani Anna, and Velli Marco
Title: Parametric Decay and the Origin of the Low-frequency Alfvénic Spectrum of the Solar Wind
Abstract:

The fast solar wind shows a wide spectrum of transverse magnetic and velocity field perturbations. These perturbations are strongly correlated in the sense of Alfvén waves propagating mostly outward, from the Sun to the interplanetary medium. They are likely to be fundamental to the acceleration and the heating of the solar wind. However, the precise origin of the broadband spectrum is unknown to date. Typical periods of chromospheric Alfvén waves are limited to a few minutes, and any longer period perturbations should be strongly reflected at the transition region. In this work, we show that minute long Alfvénic fluctuations are unstable to the parametric instability. Parametric instability enables an inverse energy cascade by exciting several-hour-long periods of Alfvénic fluctuat. . .
Date: 10/2018 Publisher: The Astrophysical Journal Pages: 38 DOI: 10.3847/1538-4357/aadb8f Available at: http://stacks.iop.org/0004-637X/866/i=1/a=38?key=crossref.877507b60fca8d8ddb73692a546936b0
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Authors: Chandran Benjamin D. G.
Title: Parametric instability, inverse cascade and the  range of solar-wind turbulence
Abstract:

In this paper, weak-turbulence theory is used to investigate the nonlinear evolution of the parametric instability in three-dimensional low-β plasmas at wavelengths much greater than the ion inertial length under the assumption that slow magnetosonic waves are strongly damped. It is shown analytically that the parametric instability leads to an inverse cascade of Alfvén wave quanta, and several exact solutions to the wave kinetic equations are presented. The main results of the paper concern the parametric decay of Alfvén waves that initially satisfy e+ ≫ e-, where e+ and e- are the frequency (f) spectra of Alfvén waves propagating in opposite directions along the magnetic field lines. If e+ initially has a peak frequency fDate: 02/2018 Publisher: Journal of Plasma Physics DOI: 10.1017/S0022377818000016 Available at: https://www.cambridge.org/core/product/identifier/S0022377818000016/type/journal_article
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Authors: Verniero J. L., Larson D. E., Livi R., Rahmati A., McManus M. D., et al.
Title: Parker Solar Probe Observations of Proton Beams Simultaneous with Ion-scale Waves
Abstract:

Parker Solar Probe (PSP), NASA's latest and closest mission to the Sun, is on a journey to investigate fundamental enigmas of the inner heliosphere. This paper reports initial observations made by the Solar Probe Analyzer for Ions (SPAN-I), one of the instruments in the Solar Wind Electrons Alphas and Protons instrument suite. We address the presence of secondary proton beams in concert with ion-scale waves observed by FIELDS, the electromagnetic fields instrument suite. We show two events from PSP's second orbit that demonstrate signatures consistent with wave-particle interactions. We showcase 3D velocity distribution functions (VDFs) measured by SPAN-I during times of strong wave power at ion scales. From an initial instability analysis, we infer that the VDFs departed far enough awa. . .
Date: 05/2020 Publisher: The Astrophysical Journal Supplement Series Pages: 5 DOI: 10.3847/1538-4365/ab86af Available at: https://iopscience.iop.org/article/10.3847/1538-4365/ab86afhttps
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Authors: Milligan Ryan O., and Ireland Jack
Title: On the Performance of Multi-Instrument Solar Flare Observations During Solar Cycle 24
Abstract:

The current fleet of space-based solar observatories offers us a wealth of opportunities to study solar flares over a range of wavelengths. Significant advances in our understanding of flare physics often come from coordinated observations between multiple instruments. Consequently, considerable efforts have been, and continue to be, made to coordinate observations among instruments ( e.g. through the Max Millennium Program of Solar Flare Research). However, there has been no study to date that quantifies how many flares have been observed by combinations of various instruments. Here we describe a technique that retrospectively searches archival databases for flares jointly observed by the Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI), Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO)/ EUV Vari. . .
Date: 02/2018 Publisher: Solar Physics DOI: 10.1007/s11207-017-1233-x Available at: http://link.springer.com/10.1007/s11207-017-1233-xhttp://link.springer.com/content/pdf/10.1007/s11207-017-1233-x.pdfhttp://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s11207-017-1233-x/fulltext.htmlhttp://link.springer.com/content/pdf/10.1007/s11207-017-1233-x.pdf
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Authors: Plus M., Auby I., Maurer D., Trut G., Del Amo Y., et al.
Title: Phytoplankton versus macrophyte contribution to primary production and biogeochemical cycles of a coastal mesotidal system. A modelling approach
Abstract:

This study presents an assessment of the contributions of various primary producers to the global annual production and N/P cycles of a coastal system, namely the Arcachon Bay, by means of a numerical model. This 3D model fully couples hydrodynamic with ecological processes and simulates nitrogen, silicon and phosphorus cycles as well as phytoplankton, macroalgae and seagrasses. Total annual production rates for the different components were calculated for different years (2005, 2007 and 2009) during a time period of drastic reduction in seagrass beds since 2005. The total demand of nitrogen and phosphorus was also calculated and discussed with regards to the riverine inputs. Moreover, this study presents the first estimation of particulate organic carbon export to the adjacent open oce. . .
Date: 11/2015 Publisher: Estuarine, Coastal and Shelf Science Pages: 52 - 60 DOI: 10.1016/j.ecss.2015.09.003 Available at: https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0272771415300810https://api.elsevier.com/content/article/PII:S0272771415300810?httpAccept=text/xmlhttps://api.elsevier.com/content/article/PII:S0272771415300810?httpAccept=text/plain
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Authors: Clemens Adam, and Burgess David
Title: Pickup ion processes associated with spacecraft thrusters: Implications for solar probe plus
Abstract:

Chemical thrusters are widely used in spacecraft for attitude control and orbital manoeuvres. They create an exhaust plume of neutral gas which produces ions via photoionization and charge exchange. Measurements of local plasma properties will be affected by perturbations caused by the coupling between the newborn ions and the plasma. A model of neutral expansion has been used in conjunction with a fully three-dimensional hybrid code to study the evolution and ionization over time of the neutral cloud produced by the firing of a mono-propellant hydrazine thruster as well as the interactions of the resulting ion cloud with the ambient solar wind. Results are presented which show that the plasma in the region near to the spacecraft will be perturbed for an extended period of time with the. . .
Date: 03/2016 Publisher: Physics of Plasmas Pages: 032901 DOI: 10.1063/1.4942938 Available at: http://aip.scitation.org/doi/10.1063/1.4942938http://aip.scitation.org/doi/pdf/10.1063/1.4942938
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Authors: Meyer‐Vernet Nicole, and Moncuquet Michel
Title: Plasma Waves in Space: The Importance of Properly Accounting for the Measuring Device
Abstract:

Electric fields are generally measured or calculated using two intuitive assumptions: (1) the electric field equals the voltage divided by the antenna length when the antenna is electromagnetically short (2) the antenna responds best to electric field along its length. Both assumptions are often incorrect for electrostatic fields because they scale as the Debye length or as the electron gyroradius, which may be smaller than the antenna length. Taking into account this little-known fact enables us to complete or correct several recent papers on plasma spontaneous fluctuations in various solar system environments.


Date: 03/2020 Publisher: Journal of Geophysical Research: Space Physics DOI: 10.1029/2019JA027723 Available at: https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/abs/10.1029/2019JA027723
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Authors: Malaspina David M., Halekas Jasper, Berčič Laura, Larson Davin, Whittlesey Phyllis, et al.
Title: Plasma Waves near the Electron Cyclotron Frequency in the Near-Sun Solar Wind
Abstract:

Data from the first two orbits of the Sun by Parker Solar Probe reveal that the solar wind sunward of 50 solar radii is replete with plasma waves and instabilities. One of the most prominent plasma wave power enhancements in this region appears near the electron cyclotron frequency (fce). Most of this wave power is concentrated in electric field fluctuations near 0.7 fce and fce, with strong harmonics of both frequencies extending above fce. At least two distinct, often concurrent, wave modes are observed, preliminarily identified as electrostatic whistler-mode waves and electron Bernstein waves. Wave intervals range in duration from a few seconds to hours. Both the amplitudes and number of detections of these near-fce waves increas. . .
Date: 02/2020 Publisher: The Astrophysical Journal Supplement Series Pages: 21 DOI: 10.3847/1538-4365/ab4c3b Available at: https://iopscience.iop.org/article/10.3847/1538-4365/ab4c3b
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Authors: Kim T. K., Pogorelov N. V., Arge C. N., Henney C. J., Jones-Mecholsky S. I., et al.
Title: Predicting the Solar Wind at the Parker Solar Probe Using an Empirically Driven MHD Model
Abstract:

Since its launch on 2018 August 12, Parker Solar Probe (PSP) has completed its first and second orbits around the Sun, having reached down to 35.7 solar radii at each perihelion. In anticipation of the exciting new data at such unprecedented distances, we have simulated the global 3D heliosphere using an MHD model coupled with a semi-empirical coronal model using the best available photospheric magnetograms as input. We compare our heliospheric MHD simulation results with in situ measurements along the PSP trajectory from its launch to the completion of the second orbit, with particular emphasis on the solar wind structure around the first two solar encounters. Furthermore, we show our model prediction for the third perihelion, which occurred on 2019 September 1. Comparison of the MHD r. . .
Date: 02/2020 Publisher: The Astrophysical Journal Supplement Series Pages: 40 DOI: 10.3847/1538-4365/ab58c9 Available at: https://iopscience.iop.org/article/10.3847/1538-4365/ab58c9
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Authors: Riley Pete, Downs Cooper, Linker Jon A., Mikic Zoran, Lionello Roberto, et al.
Title: Predicting the Structure of the Solar Corona and Inner Heliosphere during Parker Solar Probe 's First Perihelion Pass
Abstract:

NASA’s Parker Solar Probe (PSP) spacecraft reached its first perihelion of 35.7 solar radii on 2018 November 5. To aid in mission planning, and in anticipation of the unprecedented measurements to be returned, in late October, we developed a three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) solution for the solar corona and inner heliosphere, driven by the then available observations of the Sun’s photospheric magnetic field. Our model incorporates a wave-turbulence-driven model to heat the corona. Here, we present our predictions for the structure of the solar corona and the likely in situ measurements that PSP will be returning over the next few months. We infer that, in the days prior to first encounter, PSP was immersed in wind emanating from a well-established, positive-polarity north. . .
Date: 04/2019 Publisher: The Astrophysical Journal Pages: L15 DOI: 10.3847/2041-8213/ab0ec3 Available at: http://stacks.iop.org/2041-8205/874/i=2/a=L15?key=crossref.94a3f13ef95cab063c2cc60115d0f410http://stacks.iop.org/2041-8205/874/i=2/a=L15/pd
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Authors: Cranmer Steven R.
Title: Predictions for Dusty Mass Loss from Asteroids During Close Encounters with Solar Probe Plus
Abstract:

The Solar Probe Plus ( SPP) mission will explore the Sun's corona and innermost solar wind starting in 2018. The spacecraft will also come close to a number of Mercury-crossing asteroids with perihelia less than 0.3 AU. At small heliocentric distances, these objects may begin to lose mass, thus becoming "active asteroids" with comet-like comae or tails. This paper assembles a database of 97 known Mercury-crossing asteroids that may be encountered by SPP, and it presents estimates of their time-dependent visible-light fluxes and mass loss rates. Assuming a similar efficiency of sky background subtraction as was achieved by STEREO , we find that approximately 80 % of these asteroids are bright enough to be observed by the Wide-field Imager for SPP (WISPR). A model of gas/dust mass loss fr. . .
Date: 11/2016 Publisher: Earth, Moon, and Planets Pages: 51 - 79 DOI: 10.1007/s11038-016-9490-5 Available at: http://link.springer.com/10.1007/s11038-016-9490-5http://link.springer.com/content/pdf/10.1007/s11038-016-9490-5.pdfhttp://link.springer.com/content/pdf/10.1007/s11038-016-9490-5.pdfhttp://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s11038-016-9490-5/fulltext.html
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Authors: McComas D. J., Christian E. R., Cohen C. M. S., Cummings A. C., Davis A. J., et al.
Title: Probing the energetic particle environment near the Sun
Abstract:

NASA's Parker Solar Probe mission recently plunged through the inner heliosphere of the Sun to its perihelia, about 24 million kilometres from the Sun. Previous studies farther from the Sun (performed mostly at a distance of 1 astronomical unit) indicate that solar energetic particles are accelerated from a few kiloelectronvolts up to near-relativistic energies via at least two processes: "impulsive" events, which are usually associated with magnetic reconnection in solar flares and are typically enriched in electrons, helium-3 and heavier ions, and "gradual" events, which are typically associated with large coronal-mass-ejection-driven shocks and compressions moving through the corona and inner solar wind and are the dominant source of protons with energies between 1 and 10 megaelectro. . .
Date: 12/2019 Publisher: Nature Pages: 223 - 227 DOI: 10.1038/s41586-019-1811-1 Available at: http://www.nature.com/articles/s41586-019-1811-1
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Authors: Hibberd Adam, Hein Andreas M., and Eubanks Marshall
Title: Project Lyra: Catching 1I/‘Oumuamua – Mission opportunities after 2024
Abstract:

In October 2017, the first interstellar object within our solar system was discovered. Today designated 1I/'Oumuamua, it shows characteristics that have never before been observed in a celestial body. Due to these characteristics, an in-situ investigation of 1I would be of extraordinary scientific value. Previous studies have demonstrated that a mission to 1I/'Oumuamua is feasible using current and near-term technologies, however, with an anticipated launch date of 2020-2021. This is too soon to be realistic. This paper aims at addressing the question of the feasibility of a mission to 1I/'Oumuamua in 2024 and beyond. Using the OITS trajectory simulation tool, various scenarios are analyzed, including a powered Jupiter flyby and Solar Oberth maneuver, a Jupiter powered flyby, and more c. . .
Date: 05/2020 Publisher: Acta Astronautica Pages: 136 - 144 DOI: 10.1016/j.actaastro.2020.01.018 Available at: https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0094576520300291
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Authors: Hein Andreas M., Perakis Nikolaos, Eubanks Marshall, Hibberd Adam, Crowl Adam, et al.
Title: Project Lyra: Sending a spacecraft to 1I/’Oumuamua (former A/2017 U1), the interstellar asteroid
Abstract:

The first definitely interstellar object 1I/'Oumuamua (previously A/2017 U1) observed in our solar system provides the opportunity to directly study material from an other star system. Can such objects be intercepted? The challenge of reaching the object within a reasonable timeframe is formidable due to its high heliocentric hyperbolic excess velocity of about 26 km/s; much faster than any vehicle yet launched. This paper presents a high-level analysis of potential near-term options for a mission to 1I/'Oumuamua and potential similar objects. Reaching 1I/'Oumuamua via a spacecraft launched in a reasonable timeframe of 5-10 years (launch in 2022-2027) requires an Earth departure hyperbolic excess velocity between 33 and 76 km/s for mission durations between 30 and 5 years, respectively.. . .
Date: 08/2019 Publisher: Acta Astronautica Pages: 552 - 561 DOI: 10.1016/j.actaastro.2018.12.042 Available at: https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0094576518317004
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