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Authors: Marchand R., Miyake Y., Usui H., Deca J., Lapenta G., et al.
Title: Cross-comparison of spacecraft-environment interaction model predictions applied to Solar Probe Plus near perihelion
Abstract:

Five spacecraft-plasma models are used to simulate the interaction of a simplified geometry Solar Probe Plus (SPP) satellite with the space environment under representative solar wind conditions near perihelion. By considering similarities and differences between results obtained with different numerical approaches under well defined conditions, the consistency and validity of our models can be assessed. The impact on model predictions of physical effects of importance in the SPP mission is also considered by comparing results obtained with and without these effects. Simulation results are presented and compared with increasing levels of complexity in the physics of interaction between solar environment and the SPP spacecraft. The comparisons focus particularly on spacecraft floating po. . .
Date: 06/2014 Publisher: Physics of Plasmas Pages: 062901 DOI: 10.1063/1.4882439 Available at: http://aip.scitation.org/doi/10.1063/1.4882439http://aip.scitation.org/doi/pdf/10.1063/1.4882439
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Authors: Martinović Mihailo M., Klein Kristopher G., Kasper Justin C., Case Anthony W., Korreck Kelly E., et al.
Title: The Enhancement of Proton Stochastic Heating in the Near-Sun Solar Wind
Abstract:

Stochastic heating (SH) is a nonlinear heating mechanism driven by the violation of magnetic moment invariance due to large-amplitude turbulent fluctuations producing diffusion of ions toward higher kinetic energies in the direction perpendicular to the magnetic field. It is frequently invoked as a mechanism responsible for the heating of ions in the solar wind. Here, we quantify for the first time the proton SH rate Q at radial distances from the Sun as close as 0.16 au, using measurements from the first two Parker Solar Probe encounters. Our results for both the amplitude and radial trend of the heating rate, Q ∝ r−2.5, agree with previous results based on the Helios data set at heliocentric distances from 0.3 to 0.9 au. Also in agreement wit. . .
Date: 02/2020 Publisher: The Astrophysical Journal Supplement Series Pages: 30 DOI: 10.3847/1538-4365/ab527f Available at: https://iopscience.iop.org/article/10.3847/1538-4365/ab527f
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Authors: Matthaeus H., Weygand M., and Dasso S.
Title: Ensemble Space-Time Correlation of Plasma Turbulence in the Solar Wind
Abstract:

Single point measurement turbulence cannot distinguish variations in space and time. We employ an ensemble of one- and two-point measurements in the solar wind to estimate the space-time correlation function in the comoving plasma frame. The method is illustrated using near Earth spacecraft observations, employing ACE, Geotail, IMP-8, and Wind data sets. New results include an evaluation of both correlation time and correlation length from a single method, and a new assessment of the accuracy of the familiar frozen-in flow approximation. This novel view of the space-time structure of turbulence may prove essential in exploratory space missions such as Solar Probe Plus and Solar Orbiter for which the frozen-in flow hypothesis may not be a useful approximation.


Date: 06/2016 Publisher: Physical Review Letters DOI: 10.1103/PhysRevLett.116.245101 Available at: https://journals.aps.org/prl/abstract/10.1103/PhysRevLett.116.245101
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Authors: McComas D. J., Christian E. R., Cohen C. M. S., Cummings A. C., Davis A. J., et al.
Title: Probing the energetic particle environment near the Sun
Abstract:

NASA's Parker Solar Probe mission recently plunged through the inner heliosphere of the Sun to its perihelia, about 24 million kilometres from the Sun. Previous studies farther from the Sun (performed mostly at a distance of 1 astronomical unit) indicate that solar energetic particles are accelerated from a few kiloelectronvolts up to near-relativistic energies via at least two processes: "impulsive" events, which are usually associated with magnetic reconnection in solar flares and are typically enriched in electrons, helium-3 and heavier ions, and "gradual" events, which are typically associated with large coronal-mass-ejection-driven shocks and compressions moving through the corona and inner solar wind and are the dominant source of protons with energies between 1 and 10 megaelectro. . .
Date: 12/2019 Publisher: Nature Pages: 223 - 227 DOI: 10.1038/s41586-019-1811-1 Available at: http://www.nature.com/articles/s41586-019-1811-1
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Authors: McManus Michael D., Bowen Trevor A., Mallet Alfred, Chen Christopher H. K., Chandran Benjamin D. G., et al.
Title: Cross Helicity Reversals in Magnetic Switchbacks
Abstract:

We consider 2D joint distributions of normalized residual energy, σr(s, t), and cross helicity, σc(s, t), during one day of Parker Solar Probe's (PSP's) first encounter as a function of wavelet scale s. The broad features of the distributions are similar to previous observations made by Helios in slow solar wind, namely well-correlated and fairly Alfvénic wind, except for a population with negative cross helicity that is seen at shorter wavelet scales. We show that this population is due to the presence of magnetic switchbacks, or brief periods where the magnetic field polarity reverses. Such switchbacks have been observed before, both in Helios data and in Ulysses data in the polar solar wind. Their abundance and short timescales as seen by PSP in its first enc. . .
Date: 02/2020 Publisher: The Astrophysical Journal Supplement Series Pages: 67 DOI: 10.3847/1538-4365/ab6dce Available at: https://iopscience.iop.org/article/10.3847/1538-4365
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Authors: Meyer-Vernet N., Issautier K., and Moncuquet M.
Title: Quasi-thermal noise spectroscopy: The art and the practice
Abstract:

Quasi-thermal noise spectroscopy is an efficient tool for measuring in situ macroscopic plasma properties in space, using a passive wave receiver at the ports of an electric antenna. This technique was pioneered on spinning spacecraft carrying very long dipole antennas in the interplanetary medium—like ISEE-3 and Ulysses—whose geometry approached a "theoretician's dream." The technique has been extended to other instruments in various types of plasmas on board different spacecraft and will be implemented on several missions in the near future. Such extensions require different theoretical modelizations, involving magnetized, drifting, or dusty plasmas with various particle velocity distributions and antennas being shorter, biased, or made of unequal wires. We give new analytical app. . .
Date: 08/2017 Publisher: Journal of Geophysical Research: Space Physics Pages: 7925 - 7945 DOI: 10.1002/2017JA024449 Available at: http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/2017JA024449http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/wol1/doi/10.1002/2017JA024449/fullpdf
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Authors: Meyer‐Vernet Nicole, and Moncuquet Michel
Title: Plasma Waves in Space: The Importance of Properly Accounting for the Measuring Device
Abstract:

Electric fields are generally measured or calculated using two intuitive assumptions: (1) the electric field equals the voltage divided by the antenna length when the antenna is electromagnetically short (2) the antenna responds best to electric field along its length. Both assumptions are often incorrect for electrostatic fields because they scale as the Debye length or as the electron gyroradius, which may be smaller than the antenna length. Taking into account this little-known fact enables us to complete or correct several recent papers on plasma spontaneous fluctuations in various solar system environments.


Date: 03/2020 Publisher: Journal of Geophysical Research: Space Physics DOI: 10.1029/2019JA027723 Available at: https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/abs/10.1029/2019JA027723
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Authors: Milligan Ryan O., and Ireland Jack
Title: On the Performance of Multi-Instrument Solar Flare Observations During Solar Cycle 24
Abstract:

The current fleet of space-based solar observatories offers us a wealth of opportunities to study solar flares over a range of wavelengths. Significant advances in our understanding of flare physics often come from coordinated observations between multiple instruments. Consequently, considerable efforts have been, and continue to be, made to coordinate observations among instruments ( e.g. through the Max Millennium Program of Solar Flare Research). However, there has been no study to date that quantifies how many flares have been observed by combinations of various instruments. Here we describe a technique that retrospectively searches archival databases for flares jointly observed by the Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI), Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO)/ EUV Vari. . .
Date: 02/2018 Publisher: Solar Physics DOI: 10.1007/s11207-017-1233-x Available at: http://link.springer.com/10.1007/s11207-017-1233-xhttp://link.springer.com/content/pdf/10.1007/s11207-017-1233-x.pdfhttp://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s11207-017-1233-x/fulltext.htmlhttp://link.springer.com/content/pdf/10.1007/s11207-017-1233-x.pdf
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Authors: Moncuquet Michel, Meyer-Vernet Nicole, Issautier Karine, Pulupa Marc, Bonnell J. W., et al.
Title: First In Situ Measurements of Electron Density and Temperature from Quasi-thermal Noise Spectroscopy with Parker Solar Probe /FIELDS
Abstract:

Heat transport in the solar corona and wind is still a major unsolved astrophysical problem. Because of the key role played by electrons, the electron density and temperature(s) are important prerequisites for understanding these plasmas. We present such in situ measurements along the two first solar encounters of the Parker Solar Probe, between 0.5 and 0.17 au from the Sun, revealing different states of the emerging solar wind near the solar activity minimum. These preliminary results are obtained from a simplified analysis of the plasma quasi-thermal noise (QTN) spectrum measured by the Radio Frequency Spectrometer (FIELDS). The local electron density is deduced from the tracking of the plasma line, which enables accurate measurements, independent of calibrations and spacecraft pertur. . .
Date: 02/2020 Publisher: The Astrophysical Journal Supplement Series Pages: 44 DOI: 10.3847/1538-4365/ab5a84 Available at: https://iopscience.iop.org/article/10.3847/1538-4365/ab5a84
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Authors: Mondal Surajit, Oberoi Divya, and Mohan Atul
Title: First Radio Evidence for Impulsive Heating Contribution to the Quiet Solar Corona
Abstract:

This Letter explores the relevance of nanoflare-based models for heating the quiet Sun corona. Using meterwave data from the Murchison Widefield Array, we present the first successful detection of impulsive emissions down to flux densities of ∼mSFU, about two orders of magnitude weaker than earlier attempts. These impulsive emissions have durations ≲1 s and are present throughout the quiet solar corona. The fractional time occupancy of these impulsive emissions at a given region is ≲10%. The histograms of these impulsive emissions follow a power-law distribution and show signs of clustering at small timescales. Our estimate of the energy that must be dumped in the corona to generate these impulsive emissions is consistent with the coronal heating requirements. Additionally, the st. . .
Date: 06/2020 Publisher: The Astrophysical Journal Pages: L39 DOI: 10.3847/2041-8213/ab8817 Available at: https://iopscience.iop.org/article/10.3847/2041-8213/ab8817https://iopscience.iop.org/article/10.3847/2041-8213/ab8817/
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Authors: Morgan Huw, and Cook Anthony C.
Title: The Width, Density, and Outflow of Solar Coronal Streamers
Abstract:

Characterizing the large-scale structure and plasma properties of the inner corona is crucial to understanding the source and subsequent expansion of the solar wind and related space weather effects. Here, we apply a new coronal rotational tomography method, along with a method to narrow streamers and refine the density estimate, to COR2A/Solar Terrestrial Relations Observatory observations from a period near solar minimum and maximum, gaining density maps for heights between 4 and 8R. The coronal structure is highly radial at these heights, and the streamers are very narrow: in some regions, only a few degrees in width. The mean densities of streamers is almost identical between solar minimum and maximum. However, streamers at solar maximum contain around 50% more total m. . .
Date: 04/2020 Publisher: The Astrophysical Journal Pages: 57 DOI: 10.3847/1538-4357/ab7e32 Available at: https://iopscience.iop.org/article/10.3847/1538-4357/ab7e32
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Authors: Mozer F. S., and Hull A.
Title: Scaling the energy conversion rate from magnetic field reconnection to different bodies
Abstract:

Magnetic field reconnection is often invoked to explain electromagnetic energy conversion in planetary magnetospheres, stellar coronae, and other astrophysical objects. Because of the huge dynamic range of magnetic fields in these bodies, it is important to understand energy conversion as a function of magnetic field strength and related parameters. It is conjectured theoretically and shown experimentally that the energy conversion rate per unit area in reconnection scales as the cube of an appropriately weighted magnetic field strength divided by the square root of an appropriately weighted density. With this functional dependence, the energy release in flares on the Sun, the large and rapid variation of the magnetic flux in the tail of Mercury, and the apparent absence of reconnection. . .
Date: 10/2010 Publisher: Physics of Plasmas Pages: 102906 DOI: 10.1063/1.3504224 Available at: http://aip.scitation.org/doi/10.1063/1.3504224http://aip.scitation.org/doi/pdf/10.1063/1.3504224
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Authors: Mozer F. S., Agapitov O. V., Bale S. D., Bonnell J. W., Case T., et al.
Title: Switchbacks in the Solar Magnetic Field: Their Evolution, Their Content, and Their Effects on the Plasma
Abstract:

Switchbacks (rotations of the magnetic field) are observed on the Parker Solar Probe. Their evolution, content, and plasma effects are studied in this paper. The solar wind does not receive a net acceleration from switchbacks that it encountered upstream of the observation point. The typical switchback rotation angle increased with radial distance. Significant Poynting fluxes existed inside, but not outside, switchbacks, and the dependence of the Poynting flux amplitude on the switchback radial location and rotation angle is explained quantitatively as being proportional to (B sin(θ))2. The solar wind flow inside switchbacks was faster than that outside due to the frozen-in ions moving with the magnetic structure at the Alfvén speed. This energy gain results from the diverg. . .
Date: 02/2020 Publisher: The Astrophysical Journal Supplement Series Pages: 68 DOI: 10.3847/1538-4365/ab7196 Available at: https://iopscience.iop.org/article/10.3847/1538-4365/ab7196
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Authors: Mozer F. S., Agapitov O. V., Bale S. D., Bonnell J. W., Goetz K., et al.
Title: Time Domain Structures and Dust in the Solar Vicinity: Parker Solar Probe Observations
Abstract:

On 2019 April 5, while the Parker Solar Probe was at its 35 solar radius perihelion, the data set collected at 293 samples/s contained more than 10,000 examples of spiky electric-field-like structures with durations less than 200 milliseconds and amplitudes greater than 10 mV m−1. The vast majority of these events were caused by plasma turbulence. Defining dust events as those with similar, narrowly peaked, positive, and single-ended signatures resulted in finding 135 clear dust events, which, after correcting for the low detection efficiently, resulted in an estimate consistent with the 1000 dust events expected from other techniques. Defining time domain structures (TDS) as those with opposite polarity signals in the opposite antennas resulted in finding 238 clear TDS eve. . .
Date: 02/2020 Publisher: The Astrophysical Journal Supplement Series Pages: 50 DOI: 10.3847/1538-4365/ab5e4b Available at: https://iopscience.iop.org/article/10.3847/1538-4365/ab5e4b
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Authors: Nieves-Chinchilla Teresa, Szabo Adam, Korreck Kelly E., Alzate Nathalia, Balmaceda Laura A., et al.
Title: Analysis of the Internal Structure of the Streamer Blowout Observed by the Parker Solar Probe During the First Solar Encounter
Abstract:

In this paper, we present an analysis of the internal structure of a coronal mass ejection (CME) detected by in situ instruments on board the Parker Solar Probe (PSP) spacecraft during its first solar encounter. On 2018 November 11 at 23:53 UT, the FIELDS magnetometer measured an increase in strength of the magnetic field as well as a coherent change in the field direction. The SWEAP instrument simultaneously detected a low proton temperature and signatures of bidirectionality in the electron pitch angle distribution (PAD). These signatures are indicative of a CME embedded in the slow solar wind. Operating in conjunction with PSP was the STEREO A spacecraft, which enabled the remote observation of a streamer blowout by the SECCHI suite of instruments. The source at the Sun of the slow a. . .
Date: 02/2020 Publisher: The Astrophysical Journal Supplement Series Pages: 63 DOI: 10.3847/1538-4365/ab61f5 Available at: https://iopscience.iop.org/article/10.3847/1538-4365/ab61f5
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Authors: Nisticò Giuseppe, Bothmer Volker, Vourlidas Angelos, Liewer Paulett C., Thernisien Arnaud F., et al.
Title: Simulating White-Light Images of Coronal Structures for Parker Solar Probe/WISPR: Study of the Total Brightness Profiles
Abstract:

The Wide-field Imager for Parker Solar Probe (WISPR) captures unprecedented white-light images of the solar corona and inner heliosphere. Thanks to the uniqueness of the Parker Solar Probe's (PSP) orbit, WISPR is able to image "locally" coronal structures at high spatial and time resolutions. The observed plane of sky, however, rapidly changes because of the PSP's high orbital speed. Therefore, the interpretation of the dynamics of the coronal structures recorded by WISPR is not straightforward. A first study, undertaken by Liewer et al. (Solar Phys.294, 93, 2019), shows how different coronal features (e.g., streamers, flux ropes) appear in the field-of-view of WISPR by means of raytracing simulations. In particular, they analyze the effects of the spatial resolution changes on both the. . .
Date: 04/2020 Publisher: Solar Physics DOI: 10.1007/s11207-020-01626-y Available at: http://link.springer.com/10.1007/s11207-020-01626-yhttp
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Authors: Owens Mathew J., Lockwood Mike, Barnard Luke A., and MacNeil Allan R.
Title: Generation of Inverted Heliospheric Magnetic Flux by Coronal Loop Opening and Slow Solar Wind Release
Abstract:

In situ spacecraft observations provide much-needed constraints on theories of solar wind formation and release, particularly the highly variable slow solar wind, which dominates near-Earth space. Previous studies have shown an association between local inversions in the heliospheric magnetic field (HMF) and solar wind released from the vicinity of magnetically closed coronal structures. We here show that in situ properties of inverted HMF are consistent with the same hot coronal source regions as the slow solar wind. We propose that inverted HMF is produced by solar wind speed shear, which results from interchange reconnection between a coronal loop and open flux tube, and introduces a pattern of fast─slow─fast wind along a given HMF flux tube. This same loop-opening process is tho. . .
Date: 11/2018 Publisher: The Astrophysical Journal Pages: L14 DOI: 10.3847/2041-8213/aaee82 Available at: http://stacks.iop.org/2041-8205/868/i=1/a=L14?key=crossref.317335516eaf9fd091c127050a2fecdd
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Authors: Page Brent, Bale Stuart D., Bonnell J. W., Goetz Keith, Goodrich Katherine, et al.
Title: Examining Dust Directionality with the Parker Solar Probe FIELDS Instrument
Abstract:

Parker Solar Probe's (PSP's) FIELDS instrument provides a measure of the dust impact rate on the spacecraft with a full-coverage summary of the voltages recorded by the spacecraft's antennas. From consecutively sampled periods throughout PSP's orbit, FIELDS stores the maximum amplitude measured by each active antenna. The occurrence of a dust impact during a given period can be identified by these amplitudes exceeding a few tens of millivolts, and a dust grain's impact location can be approximated using the differential amplitudes between antennas. The impact locations indicated in the data are inspected for compatibility with the incident directions of prograde, retrograde, and β-meteoroid orbits in the ecliptic. Important features in the data are consistent with the incidence of β-m. . .
Date: 02/2020 Publisher: The Astrophysical Journal Supplement Series Pages: 51 DOI: 10.3847/1538-4365/ab5f6a Available at: https://iopscience.iop.org/article/10.3847/1538-4365/ab5f6a
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Authors: Panasenco Olga, Velli Marco, D’Amicis Raffaella, Shi Chen, Réville Victor, et al.
Title: Exploring Solar Wind Origins and Connecting Plasma Flows from the Parker Solar Probe to 1 au: Nonspherical Source Surface and Alfvénic Fluctuations
Abstract:

The magnetic field measurements of the FIELDS instrument on the Parker Solar Probe (PSP) have shown intensities, throughout its first solar encounter, that require a very low source surface (SS) height ( R SS ⩽1.8R ⊙  RSS⩽1.8R⊙ ) to be reconciled with magnetic field measurements at the Sun via potential field extrapolation (PFSS). However, during PSP's second encounter, the situation went back to a more classic SS height ( R SS ⩽2.5R ⊙  RSS⩽2.5R⊙ ). Here we use high-resolution observations of the photospheric magnetic field (Solar Dynamics Observatory/Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager) to calculate neutral lines and boundaries of the open field regions for SS heights from 1.2 to 2.5 RDate: 02/2020 Publisher: The Astrophysical Journal Supplement Series Pages: 54 DOI: 10.3847/1538-4365/ab61f4 Available at: https://iopscience.iop.org/article/10.3847/1538-4365/ab61f4
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Authors: Parashar T. N., Goldstein M. L., Maruca B. A., Matthaeus W. H., Ruffolo D., et al.
Title: Measures of Scale-dependent Alfvénicity in the First PSP Solar Encounter
Abstract:

The solar wind shows periods of highly Alfvénic activity, where velocity fluctuations and magnetic fluctuations are aligned or antialigned with each other. It is generally agreed that solar wind plasma velocity and magnetic field fluctuations observed by the Parker Solar Probe (PSP) during the first encounter are mostly highly Alfvénic. However, quantitative measures of Alfvénicity are needed to understand how the characterization of these fluctuations compares with standard measures from prior missions in the inner and outer heliosphere, in fast wind and slow wind, and at high and low latitudes. To investigate this issue, we employ several measures to quantify the extent of Alfvénicity—the Alfvén ratio rA, the normalized cross helicity σc, the normalized r. . .
Date: 02/2020 Publisher: The Astrophysical Journal Supplement Series Pages: 58 DOI: 10.3847/1538-4365/ab64e6 Available at: https://iopscience.iop.org/article/10.3847/1538-4365/ab64e6
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Authors: Parashar T. N., Cuesta M., and Matthaeus W. H.
Title: Reynolds Number and Intermittency in the Expanding Solar Wind: Predictions Based on Voyager Observations
Abstract:

The large-scale features of the solar wind are examined in order to predict small-scale features of turbulence in unexplored regions of the heliosphere. The strategy is to examine how system size, or effective Reynolds number Re, varies, and then how this quantity influences observable statistical properties, including intermittency properties of solar wind turbulence. The expectation based on similar hydrodynamics scalings is that the kurtosis, of the small-scale magnetic field increments, will increase with increasing Re. Simple theoretical arguments as well as Voyager observations indicate that effective interplanetary turbulence Re decreases with increasing heliocentric distance. The decrease of scale-dependent magnetic increment kurtosis with increasing heliocentric distance is ver. . .
Date: 10/2019 Publisher: The Astrophysical Journal Pages: L57 DOI: 10.3847/2041-8213/ab4a82 Available at: https://iopscience.iop.org/article/10.3847/2041-8213/ab4a82
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Authors: Parker Eugene N.
Title: Exploring the innermost solar atmosphere
Abstract:

The Parker Solar Probe spacecraft completed the first two of its 24 scheduled orbits around the Sun on 18 June 2019, making history by flying halfway between Mercury and the Sun.


Date: 01/2020 Publisher: Nature Astronomy Pages: 19 - 20 DOI: 10.1038/s41550-019-0985-7 Available at: http://www.nature.com/articles/s41550-019-0985-7
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Authors: Pavan J., and Viñas A. F.
Title: Temperature Fluctuation at the Sun and Large-scale Electric Field in Solar Wind: A Challenge for the Parker Solar Probe Mission
Abstract:

Velocity distributions of particles are key elements in the study of solar wind. The physical mechanisms that regulate their many features are a matter of debate. The present work addresses the subject with a fully analytical method in order to establish the shape of particle velocity distributions in solar wind. The method consists of solving the steady-state kinetic equation for particles and the related fluid equations, with spatial profiles for density and temperature that match general observational data. The model is one-dimensional in configuration-space and two-dimensional in velocity-space, and accounts for large-scale processes, namely, advection, gravity, magnetic mirroring, and the large-scale ambipolar electric field. The findings reported add to the general understanding o. . .
Date: 09/2019 Publisher: The Astrophysical Journal Pages: 28 DOI: 10.3847/1538-4357/ab2fcd
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Authors: Pecora Francesco, Greco Antonella, Hu Qiang, Servidio Sergio, Chasapis Alexandros G., et al.
Title: Single-spacecraft Identification of Flux Tubes and Current Sheets in the Solar Wind
Abstract:

A novel technique is presented for describing and visualizing the local topology of the magnetic field using single-spacecraft data in the solar wind. The approach merges two established techniques: the Grad─Shafranov (GS) reconstruction method, which provides a plausible regional two-dimensional magnetic field surrounding the spacecraft trajectory, and the Partial Variance of Increments (PVI) technique that identifies coherent magnetic structures, such as current sheets. When applied to one month of Wind magnetic field data at 1 minute resolution, we find that the quasi-two-dimensional turbulence emerges as a sea of magnetic islands and current sheets. Statistical analysis confirms that current sheets associated with high values of PVI are mostly located between and within the GS mag. . .
Date: 08/2019 Publisher: The Astrophysical Journal Pages: L11 DOI: 10.3847/2041-8213/ab32d9 Available at: https://iopscience.iop.org/article/10.3847/2041-8213/ab32d9
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Authors: Perrone Denise, Stansby D, Horbury T S, and Matteini L
Title: Radial evolution of the solar wind in pure high-speed streams: HELIOS revised observations
Abstract:

Spacecraft observations have shown that the proton temperature in the solar wind falls off with radial distance more slowly than expected for an adiabatic prediction. Usually, previous studies have been focused on the evolution of the solar-wind plasma by using the bulk speed as an order parameter to discriminate different regimes. In contrast, here, we study the radial evolution of pure and homogeneous fast streams (i.e. well-defined streams of coronal-hole plasma that maintain their identity during several solar rotations) by means of re-processed particle data, from the HELIOS satellites between 0.3 and 1 au. We have identified 16 intervals of unperturbed high-speed coronal-hole plasma, from three different sources and measured at different radial distances. The observations show tha. . .
Date: 03/2019 Publisher: Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society Pages: 3730 - 3737 DOI: 10.1093/mnras/sty3348 Available at: https://academic.oup.com/mnras/article/483/3/3730/5237719http://academic.oup.com/mnras/article-pdf/483/3/3730/27299782/sty3348.pdf
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