Found 116 results
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2020
Authors: Macneil Allan R, Owens Mathew J, Wicks Robert T, Lockwood Mike, Bentley Sarah N, et al.
Title: The evolution of inverted magnetic fields through the inner heliosphereABSTRACT
Abstract:

Local inversions are often observed in the heliospheric magnetic field (HMF), but their origins and evolution are not yet fully understood. Parker Solar Probe has recently observed rapid, Alfvénic, HMF inversions in the inner heliosphere, known as ’switchbacks’, which have been interpreted as the possible remnants of coronal jets. It has also been suggested that inverted HMF may be produced by near-Sun interchange reconnection; a key process in mechanisms proposed for slow solar wind release. These cases suggest that the source of inverted HMF is near the Sun, and it follows that these inversions would gradually decay and straighten as they propagate out through the heliosphere. Alternatively, HMF inversions could form during solar wind transit, through phenomena such velocity shea. . .
Date: 04-2020 Publisher: Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society Pages: 3642 - 3655 DOI: 10.1093/mnras/staa951 Available at: https://academic.oup.com/mnras/article/494/3/3642/5819029
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Authors: Macneil Allan R, Owens Mathew J, Wicks Robert T, Lockwood Mike, Bentley Sarah N, et al.
Title: The evolution of inverted magnetic fields through the inner heliosphereABSTRACT
Abstract:

Local inversions are often observed in the heliospheric magnetic field (HMF), but their origins and evolution are not yet fully understood. Parker Solar Probe has recently observed rapid, Alfvénic, HMF inversions in the inner heliosphere, known as 'switchbacks', which have been interpreted as the possible remnants of coronal jets. It has also been suggested that inverted HMF may be produced by near-Sun interchange reconnection; a key process in mechanisms proposed for slow solar wind release. These cases suggest that the source of inverted HMF is near the Sun, and it follows that these inversions would gradually decay and straighten as they propagate out through the heliosphere. Alternatively, HMF inversions could form during solar wind transit, through phenomena such velocity shears, . . .
Date: 04-2020 Publisher: Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society Pages: 3642 - 3655 DOI: 10.1093/mnras/staa951 Available at: https://academic.oup.com/mnras/article/494/3/3642/5819029
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Authors: Perrone D., D’Amicis R., De Marco R., Matteini L., Stansby D., et al.
Title: Highly Alfvénic slow solar wind at 0.3 au during a solar minimum: Helios insights for Parker Solar Probe and Solar Orbiter
Abstract:

Alfvénic fluctuations in solar wind are an intrinsic property of fast streams, while slow intervals typically have a very low degree of Alfvénicity, with much more variable parameters. However, sometimes a slow wind can be highly Alfvénic. Here we compare three different regimes of solar wind, in terms of Alfvénic content and spectral properties, during a minimum phase of the solar activity and at 0.3 au. We show that fast and Alfvénic slow intervals share some common characteristics. This would suggest a similar solar origin, with the latter coming from over-expanded magnetic field lines, in agreement with observations at 1 au and at the maximum of the solar cycle. Due to the Alfvénic nature of the fluctuations in both fast and Alfvénic slow winds, we observe a well-defined corr. . .
Date: 01/2020 Publisher: Astronomy & Astrophysics Pages: A166 DOI: 10.1051/0004-6361/201937064 Available at: https://www.aanda.org/10.1051/0004-6361/201937064https://www.aanda.org/10.1051/0004-6361/201937064/pdf
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Authors: Perrone D., D’Amicis R., De Marco R., Matteini L., Stansby D., et al.
Title: Highly Alfvénic slow solar wind at 0.3 au during a solar minimum: Helios insights for Parker Solar Probe and Solar Orbiter
Abstract:

Alfvénic fluctuations in solar wind are an intrinsic property of fast streams, while slow intervals typically have a very low degree of Alfvénicity, with much more variable parameters. However, sometimes a slow wind can be highly Alfvénic. Here we compare three different regimes of solar wind, in terms of Alfvénic content and spectral properties, during a minimum phase of the solar activity and at 0.3 au. We show that fast and Alfvénic slow intervals share some common characteristics. This would suggest a similar solar origin, with the latter coming from over-expanded magnetic field lines, in agreement with observations at 1 au and at the maximum of the solar cycle. Due to the Alfvénic nature of the fluctuations in both fast and Alfvénic slow winds, we observe a well-defined corr. . .
Date: 01/2020 Publisher: Astronomy & Astrophysics Pages: A166 DOI: 10.1051/0004-6361/201937064 Available at: https://www.aanda.org/10.1051/0004-6361/201937064https://www.aanda.org/10.1051/0004-6361/201937064/pdf
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Authors: Verniero J. L., Larson D. E., Livi R., Rahmati A., McManus M. D., et al.
Title: Parker Solar Probe Observations of Proton Beams Simultaneous with Ion-scale Waves
Abstract:

Parker Solar Probe (PSP), NASA’s latest and closest mission to the Sun, is on a journey to investigate fundamental enigmas of the inner heliosphere. This paper reports initial observations made by the Solar Probe Analyzer for Ions (SPAN-I), one of the instruments in the Solar Wind Electrons Alphas and Protons instrument suite. We address the presence of secondary proton beams in concert with ion-scale waves observed by FIELDS, the electromagnetic fields instrument suite. We show two events from PSP’s second orbit that demonstrate signatures consistent with wave-particle interactions. We showcase 3D velocity distribution functions (VDFs) measured by SPAN-I during times of strong wave power at ion scales. From an initial instability analysis, we infer that the VDFs departed far enough. . .
Date: 05/2020 Publisher: The Astrophysical Journal Supplement Series Pages: 5 DOI: 10.3847/1538-4365/ab86af Available at: https://iopscience.iop.org/article/10.3847/1538-4365/ab86afhttps
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Authors: Verniero J. L., Larson D. E., Livi R., Rahmati A., McManus M. D., et al.
Title: Parker Solar Probe Observations of Proton Beams Simultaneous with Ion-scale Waves
Abstract:

Parker Solar Probe (PSP), NASA's latest and closest mission to the Sun, is on a journey to investigate fundamental enigmas of the inner heliosphere. This paper reports initial observations made by the Solar Probe Analyzer for Ions (SPAN-I), one of the instruments in the Solar Wind Electrons Alphas and Protons instrument suite. We address the presence of secondary proton beams in concert with ion-scale waves observed by FIELDS, the electromagnetic fields instrument suite. We show two events from PSP's second orbit that demonstrate signatures consistent with wave-particle interactions. We showcase 3D velocity distribution functions (VDFs) measured by SPAN-I during times of strong wave power at ion scales. From an initial instability analysis, we infer that the VDFs departed far enough awa. . .
Date: 05/2020 Publisher: The Astrophysical Journal Supplement Series Pages: 5 DOI: 10.3847/1538-4365/ab86af Available at: https://iopscience.iop.org/article/10.3847/1538-4365/ab86afhttps
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Authors: Whittlesey Phyllis L., Larson Davin E., Kasper Justin C., Halekas Jasper, Abatcha Mamuda, et al.
Title: The Solar Probe ANalyzers—Electrons on the Parker Solar Probe
Abstract:

Electrostatic analyzers of different designs have been used since the earliest days of the space age, beginning with the very earliest solar-wind measurements made by Mariner 2 en route to Venus in 1962. The Parker Solar Probe (PSP) mission, NASA’s first dedicated mission to study the innermost reaches of the heliosphere, makes its thermal plasma measurements using a suite of instruments called the Solar Wind Electrons, Alphas, and Protons (SWEAP) investigation. SWEAP’s electron PSP Analyzer (Solar Probe ANalyzer-Electron (SPAN-E)) instruments are a pair of top-hat electrostatic analyzers on PSP that are capable of measuring the electron distribution function in the solar wind from 2 eV to 30 keV. For the first time, in situ measurements of thermal electrons provided by SPAN-E will . . .
Date: 02/2020 Publisher: The Astrophysical Journal Supplement Series Pages: 74 DOI: 10.3847/1538-4365/ab7370 Available at: https://iopscience.iop.org/article/10.3847/1538-4365/ab7370https://iopscience.iop.org/article/10.3847/1538-4365/ab7370/pdf
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Authors: Whittlesey Phyllis L., Larson Davin E., Kasper Justin C., Halekas Jasper, Abatcha Mamuda, et al.
Title: The Solar Probe ANalyzers—Electrons on the Parker Solar Probe
Abstract:

Electrostatic analyzers of different designs have been used since the earliest days of the space age, beginning with the very earliest solar-wind measurements made by Mariner 2 en route to Venus in 1962. The Parker Solar Probe (PSP) mission, NASA’s first dedicated mission to study the innermost reaches of the heliosphere, makes its thermal plasma measurements using a suite of instruments called the Solar Wind Electrons, Alphas, and Protons (SWEAP) investigation. SWEAP’s electron PSP Analyzer (Solar Probe ANalyzer-Electron (SPAN-E)) instruments are a pair of top-hat electrostatic analyzers on PSP that are capable of measuring the electron distribution function in the solar wind from 2 eV to 30 keV. For the first time, in situ measurements of thermal electrons provided by SPAN-E will . . .
Date: 02/2020 Publisher: The Astrophysical Journal Supplement Series Pages: 74 DOI: 10.3847/1538-4365/ab7370 Available at: https://iopscience.iop.org/article/10.3847/1538-4365/ab7370https://iopscience.iop.org/article/10.3847/1538-4365/ab7370/pdf
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Authors: Réville Victor, Velli Marco, Rouillard Alexis P., Lavraud Benoit, Tenerani Anna, et al.
Title: Tearing Instability and Periodic Density Perturbations in the Slow Solar Wind
Abstract:

In contrast with the fast solar wind, which originates in coronal holes, the source of the slow solar wind is still debated. Often intermittent and enriched with low first ionization potential elements—akin to what is observed in closed coronal loops—the slow wind could form in bursty events nearby helmet streamers. Slow winds also exhibit density perturbations that have been shown to be periodic and could be associated with flux ropes ejected from the tip of helmet streamers, as shown recently by the WISPR white-light imager on board Parker Solar Probe (PSP). In this work, we propose that the main mechanism controlling the release of flux ropes is a flow-modified tearing mode at the heliospheric current sheet (HCS). We use magnetohydrodynamic simulations of the solar wind and coron. . .
Date: 05/2020 Publisher: The Astrophysical Journal Pages: L20 DOI: 10.3847/2041-8213/ab911d Available at: https://iopscience.iop.org/article/10.3847/2041-8213/ab911d
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Authors: Réville Victor, Velli Marco, Rouillard Alexis P., Lavraud Benoit, Tenerani Anna, et al.
Title: Tearing Instability and Periodic Density Perturbations in the Slow Solar Wind
Abstract:

In contrast with the fast solar wind, which originates in coronal holes, the source of the slow solar wind is still debated. Often intermittent and enriched with low first ionization potential elements—akin to what is observed in closed coronal loops—the slow wind could form in bursty events nearby helmet streamers. Slow winds also exhibit density perturbations that have been shown to be periodic and could be associated with flux ropes ejected from the tip of helmet streamers, as shown recently by the WISPR white-light imager on board Parker Solar Probe (PSP). In this work, we propose that the main mechanism controlling the release of flux ropes is a flow-modified tearing mode at the heliospheric current sheet (HCS). We use magnetohydrodynamic simulations of the solar wind and coron. . .
Date: 05/2020 Publisher: The Astrophysical Journal Pages: L20 DOI: 10.3847/2041-8213/ab911d Available at: https://iopscience.iop.org/article/10.3847/2041-8213/ab911d
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2019
Authors: Chhiber Rohit, Usmanov Arcadi V., Matthaeus William H., and Goldstein Melvyn L.
Title: Contextual Predictions for the Parker Solar Probe . I. Critical Surfaces and Regions
Abstract:

The solar corona and young solar wind may be characterized by critical surfaces—the sonic, Alfvén, and first plasma-β unity surfaces—that demarcate regions where the solar wind flow undergoes certain crucial transformations. Global numerical simulations and remote sensing observations offer a natural mode for the study of these surfaces at large scales, thus providing valuable context for the high-resolution in situ measurements expected from the recently launched Parker Solar Probe (PSP). The present study utilizes global three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulations of the solar wind to characterize the critical surfaces and investigate the flow in propinquitous regions. Effects of solar activity are incorporated by varying source magnetic dipole tilts and employing ma. . .
Date: 03/2019 Publisher: The Astrophysical Journal Supplement Series Pages: 11 DOI: 10.3847/1538-4365/ab0652 Available at: http://stacks.iop.org/0067-0049/241/i=1/a=11?key=crossref.5e73dbbb501083f4d606cdf21e74f766http://stacks.iop.org/0067-0049/241/i=1/a=11/
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Authors: Chhiber Rohit, Usmanov Arcadi V., Matthaeus William H., and Goldstein Melvyn L.
Title: Contextual Predictions for the Parker Solar Probe . I. Critical Surfaces and Regions
Abstract:

The solar corona and young solar wind may be characterized by critical surfaces—the sonic, Alfvén, and first plasma-β unity surfaces—that demarcate regions where the solar wind flow undergoes certain crucial transformations. Global numerical simulations and remote sensing observations offer a natural mode for the study of these surfaces at large scales, thus providing valuable context for the high-resolution in situ measurements expected from the recently launched Parker Solar Probe (PSP). The present study utilizes global three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulations of the solar wind to characterize the critical surfaces and investigate the flow in propinquitous regions. Effects of solar activity are incorporated by varying source magnetic dipole tilts and employing ma. . .
Date: 03/2019 Publisher: The Astrophysical Journal Supplement Series Pages: 11 DOI: 10.3847/1538-4365/ab0652 Available at: http://stacks.iop.org/0067-0049/241/i=1/a=11?key=crossref.5e73dbbb501083f4d606cdf21e74f766http://stacks.iop.org/0067-0049/241/i=1/a=11/
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Authors: Wilson Lynn B., Chen Li-Jen, Wang Shan, Schwartz Steven J., Turner Drew L., et al.
Title: Electron Energy Partition across Interplanetary Shocks. II. Statistics
Abstract:

A statistical analysis of 15,210 electron velocity distribution function (VDF) fits, observed within ±2 hr of 52 interplanetary (IP) shocks by the Wind spacecraft near 1 au, is presented. This is the second in a three-part series on electron VDFs near IP shocks. The electron velocity moment statistics for the dense, low-energy core, tenuous, hot halo, and field-aligned beam/strahl are a statistically significant list of values illustrated with both histograms and tabular lists for reference and baselines in future work. Given the large statistics in this investigation, the beam/strahl fit results in the upstream are now the most comprehensive attempt to parameterize the beam/strahl electron velocity moments in the ambient solar wind. The median density, temperature, beta, and temperatu. . .
Date: 12/2019 Publisher: The Astrophysical Journal Supplement Series Pages: 24 DOI: 10.3847/1538-4365/ab5445 Available at: https://iopscience.iop.org/article/10.3847/1538-4365/ab5445
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Authors: Telloni Daniele, Giordano Silvio, and Antonucci Ester
Title: On the Fast Solar Wind Heating and Acceleration Processes: A Statistical Study Based on the UVCS Survey Data
Abstract:

The UltraViolet Coronagraph Spectrometer (UVCS) on board the SOlar and Heliospheric Observatory has almost continuously observed, throughout the whole solar cycle 23, the UV solar corona. This work addresses the first-ever statistical analysis of the daily UVCS observations, performed in the O VI channel, of the northern polar coronal hole, between 1.5 and 3 R , during the period of low solar activity from 1996 April to 1997 December. The study is based on the investigation, at different heights, of the correlation between the variance of the O VI 1031.92 Å spectral line and the O VI 1031.92, 1037.61 Å doublet intensity ratio, which are proxies of the kinetic temperature of the O5+ ions and of the speed of the oxygen component of the fast solar wind, respectiv. . .
Date: 08/2019 Publisher: The Astrophysical Journal Pages: L36 DOI: 10.3847/2041-8213/ab3731 Available at: https://iopscience.iop.org/article/10.3847/2041-8213/ab3731
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Authors: Telloni Daniele, Giordano Silvio, and Antonucci Ester
Title: On the Fast Solar Wind Heating and Acceleration Processes: A Statistical Study Based on the UVCS Survey Data
Abstract:

The UltraViolet Coronagraph Spectrometer (UVCS) on board the SOlar and Heliospheric Observatory has almost continuously observed, throughout the whole solar cycle 23, the UV solar corona. This work addresses the first-ever statistical analysis of the daily UVCS observations, performed in the O VI channel, of the northern polar coronal hole, between 1.5 and 3 R , during the period of low solar activity from 1996 April to 1997 December. The study is based on the investigation, at different heights, of the correlation between the variance of the O VI 1031.92 Å spectral line and the O VI 1031.92, 1037.61 Å doublet intensity ratio, which are proxies of the kinetic temperature of the O5+ ions and of the speed of the oxygen component of the fast solar wind, respectiv. . .
Date: 08/2019 Publisher: The Astrophysical Journal Pages: L36 DOI: 10.3847/2041-8213/ab3731 Available at: https://iopscience.iop.org/article/10.3847/2041-8213/ab3731
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Authors: Scudder J. D.
Title: The Long-standing Closure Crisis in Coronal Plasmas
Abstract:

Coronal and solar wind physics have long used plasma fluid models to motivate physical explanations of observations; the hypothesized model is introduced into a fluid simulation to see if observations are reproduced. This procedure is called Verification of Mechanism (VoM) modeling; it is contingent on the self consistency of the closure that made the simulation possible. Inner corona VoMs typically assume weak gradient Spitzer─Braginskii closures. Four prominent coronal VoMs in place for decades are shown to contradict their closure hypotheses, demonstrably shaping coronal and solar wind research. These findings have been possible since 1953. This unchallenged evolution is worth understanding, so that similarly flawed VoMs do not continue to mislead new research. As a first step in t. . .
Date: 11/2019 Publisher: The Astrophysical Journal Pages: 148 DOI: 10.3847/1538-4357/ab48e0 Available at: https://iopscience.iop.org/article/10.3847/1538-4357/ab48e0
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Authors: Scudder J. D.
Title: The Long-standing Closure Crisis in Coronal Plasmas
Abstract:

Coronal and solar wind physics have long used plasma fluid models to motivate physical explanations of observations; the hypothesized model is introduced into a fluid simulation to see if observations are reproduced. This procedure is called Verification of Mechanism (VoM) modeling; it is contingent on the self consistency of the closure that made the simulation possible. Inner corona VoMs typically assume weak gradient Spitzer-Braginskii closures. Four prominent coronal VoMs in place for decades are shown to contradict their closure hypotheses, demonstrably shaping coronal and solar wind research. These findings have been possible since 1953. This unchallenged evolution is worth understanding, so that similarly flawed VoMs do not continue to mislead new research. As a first step in thi. . .
Date: 11/2019 Publisher: The Astrophysical Journal Pages: 148 DOI: 10.3847/1538-4357/ab48e0 Available at: https://iopscience.iop.org/article/10.3847/1538-4357/ab48e0
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Authors: Chang Qing, Xu Xiaojun, Xu Qi, Zhong Jun, Xu Jiaying, et al.
Title: Multiple-point Modeling the Parker Spiral Configuration of the Solar Wind Magnetic Field at the Solar Maximum of Solar Cycle 24
Abstract:

By assuming that the solar wind flow is spherically symmetric and that the flow speed becomes constant beyond some critical distance r = R 0 (neglecting solar gravitation and acceleration by high coronal temperature), the large-scale solar wind magnetic field lines are distorted into a Parker spiral configuration, which is usually simplified to an Archimedes spiral. Using magnetic field observations near Mercury, Venus, and Earth during solar maximum of Solar Cycle 24, we statistically surveyed the Parker spiral angles and obtained the empirical equations of the Archimedes and Parker spirals by fitting the multiple-point results. We found that the solar wind magnetic field configurations are slightly different during different years. Archimedes and Parker spiral configuration. . .
Date: 10/2019 Publisher: The Astrophysical Journal Pages: 102 DOI: 10.3847/1538-4357/ab412a Available at: https://iopscience.iop.org/article/10.3847/1538-4357/ab412
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Authors: Chang Qing, Xu Xiaojun, Xu Qi, Zhong Jun, Xu Jiaying, et al.
Title: Multiple-point Modeling the Parker Spiral Configuration of the Solar Wind Magnetic Field at the Solar Maximum of Solar Cycle 24
Abstract:

By assuming that the solar wind flow is spherically symmetric and that the flow speed becomes constant beyond some critical distance r = R 0 (neglecting solar gravitation and acceleration by high coronal temperature), the large-scale solar wind magnetic field lines are distorted into a Parker spiral configuration, which is usually simplified to an Archimedes spiral. Using magnetic field observations near Mercury, Venus, and Earth during solar maximum of Solar Cycle 24, we statistically surveyed the Parker spiral angles and obtained the empirical equations of the Archimedes and Parker spirals by fitting the multiple-point results. We found that the solar wind magnetic field configurations are slightly different during different years. Archimedes and Parker spiral configuration. . .
Date: 10/2019 Publisher: The Astrophysical Journal Pages: 102 DOI: 10.3847/1538-4357/ab412a Available at: https://iopscience.iop.org/article/10.3847/1538-4357/ab412
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Authors: Riley Pete, Downs Cooper, Linker Jon A., Mikic Zoran, Lionello Roberto, et al.
Title: Predicting the Structure of the Solar Corona and Inner Heliosphere during Parker Solar Probe 's First Perihelion Pass
Abstract:

NASA’s Parker Solar Probe (PSP) spacecraft reached its first perihelion of 35.7 solar radii on 2018 November 5. To aid in mission planning, and in anticipation of the unprecedented measurements to be returned, in late October, we developed a three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) solution for the solar corona and inner heliosphere, driven by the then available observations of the Sun’s photospheric magnetic field. Our model incorporates a wave-turbulence-driven model to heat the corona. Here, we present our predictions for the structure of the solar corona and the likely in situ measurements that PSP will be returning over the next few months. We infer that, in the days prior to first encounter, PSP was immersed in wind emanating from a well-established, positive-polarity north. . .
Date: 04/2019 Publisher: The Astrophysical Journal Pages: L15 DOI: 10.3847/2041-8213/ab0ec3 Available at: http://stacks.iop.org/2041-8205/874/i=2/a=L15?key=crossref.94a3f13ef95cab063c2cc60115d0f410http://stacks.iop.org/2041-8205/874/i=2/a=L15/pd
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Authors: Riley Pete, Downs Cooper, Linker Jon A., Mikic Zoran, Lionello Roberto, et al.
Title: Predicting the Structure of the Solar Corona and Inner Heliosphere during Parker Solar Probe ’s First Perihelion Pass
Abstract:

NASA’s Parker Solar Probe (PSP) spacecraft reached its first perihelion of 35.7 solar radii on 2018 November 5. To aid in mission planning, and in anticipation of the unprecedented measurements to be returned, in late October, we developed a three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) solution for the solar corona and inner heliosphere, driven by the then available observations of the Sun’s photospheric magnetic field. Our model incorporates a wave-turbulence-driven model to heat the corona. Here, we present our predictions for the structure of the solar corona and the likely in situ measurements that PSP will be returning over the next few months. We infer that, in the days prior to first encounter, PSP was immersed in wind emanating from a well-established, positive-polarity north. . .
Date: 04/2019 Publisher: The Astrophysical Journal Pages: L15 DOI: 10.3847/2041-8213/ab0ec3 Available at: http://stacks.iop.org/2041-8205/874/i=2/a=L15?key=crossref.94a3f13ef95cab063c2cc60115d0f410http://stacks.iop.org/2041-8205/874/i=2/a=L15/pd
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Authors: Parashar T. N., Cuesta M., and Matthaeus W. H.
Title: Reynolds Number and Intermittency in the Expanding Solar Wind: Predictions Based on Voyager Observations
Abstract:

The large-scale features of the solar wind are examined in order to predict small-scale features of turbulence in unexplored regions of the heliosphere. The strategy is to examine how system size, or effective Reynolds number Re, varies, and then how this quantity influences observable statistical properties, including intermittency properties of solar wind turbulence. The expectation based on similar hydrodynamics scalings is that the kurtosis, of the small-scale magnetic field increments, will increase with increasing Re. Simple theoretical arguments as well as Voyager observations indicate that effective interplanetary turbulence Re decreases with increasing heliocentric distance. The decrease of scale-dependent magnetic increment kurtosis with increasing heliocentric distance is ver. . .
Date: 10/2019 Publisher: The Astrophysical Journal Pages: L57 DOI: 10.3847/2041-8213/ab4a82 Available at: https://iopscience.iop.org/article/10.3847/2041-8213/ab4a82
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Authors: Parashar T. N., Cuesta M., and Matthaeus W. H.
Title: Reynolds Number and Intermittency in the Expanding Solar Wind: Predictions Based on Voyager Observations
Abstract:

The large-scale features of the solar wind are examined in order to predict small-scale features of turbulence in unexplored regions of the heliosphere. The strategy is to examine how system size, or effective Reynolds number Re, varies, and then how this quantity influences observable statistical properties, including intermittency properties of solar wind turbulence. The expectation based on similar hydrodynamics scalings is that the kurtosis, of the small-scale magnetic field increments, will increase with increasing Re. Simple theoretical arguments as well as Voyager observations indicate that effective interplanetary turbulence Re decreases with increasing heliocentric distance. The decrease of scale-dependent magnetic increment kurtosis with increasing heliocentric distance is ver. . .
Date: 10/2019 Publisher: The Astrophysical Journal Pages: L57 DOI: 10.3847/2041-8213/ab4a82 Available at: https://iopscience.iop.org/article/10.3847/2041-8213/ab4a82
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Authors: Verscharen Daniel, Chandran Benjamin D. G., Jeong Seong-Yeop, Salem Chadi S., Pulupa Marc P., et al.
Title: Self-induced Scattering of Strahl Electrons in the Solar Wind
Abstract:

We investigate the scattering of strahl electrons by microinstabilities as a mechanism for creating the electron halo in the solar wind. We develop a mathematical framework for the description of electron-driven microinstabilities and discuss the associated physical mechanisms. We find that an instability of the oblique fast-magnetosonic/whistler (FM/W) mode is the best candidate for a microinstability that scatters strahl electrons into the halo. We derive approximate analytic expressions for the FM/W instability threshold in two different β c regimes, where β c is the ratio of the core electrons’ thermal pressure to the magnetic pressure, and confirm the accuracy of these thresholds through comparison with numerical solutions to the hot-plasma dispersion rela. . .
Date: 12/2019 Publisher: The Astrophysical Journal Pages: 136 DOI: 10.3847/1538-4357/ab4c30 Available at: https://iopscience.iop.org/article/10.3847/1538-4357/ab4c30https://iopscience.iop.org/article/10.3847/1538-4357/ab4c30/
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Authors: Verscharen Daniel, Chandran Benjamin D. G., Jeong Seong-Yeop, Salem Chadi S., Pulupa Marc P., et al.
Title: Self-induced Scattering of Strahl Electrons in the Solar Wind
Abstract:

We investigate the scattering of strahl electrons by microinstabilities as a mechanism for creating the electron halo in the solar wind. We develop a mathematical framework for the description of electron-driven microinstabilities and discuss the associated physical mechanisms. We find that an instability of the oblique fast-magnetosonic/whistler (FM/W) mode is the best candidate for a microinstability that scatters strahl electrons into the halo. We derive approximate analytic expressions for the FM/W instability threshold in two different β c regimes, where β c is the ratio of the core electrons’ thermal pressure to the magnetic pressure, and confirm the accuracy of these thresholds through comparison with numerical solutions to the hot-plasma dispersion rela. . .
Date: 12/2019 Publisher: The Astrophysical Journal Pages: 136 DOI: 10.3847/1538-4357/ab4c30 Available at: https://iopscience.iop.org/article/10.3847/1538-4357/ab4c30https://iopscience.iop.org/article/10.3847/1538-4357/ab4c30/
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